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Focus on What You Have to Gain

One reason people resist change is because they focus on what they have to give up, instead of what they have to gain. - Rick Godwin
We all know there’s no “quick fix” to weight loss—this program is an  attempt to make it as easy as possible, but there’s no doubt that weight loss is hard work, no matter your method.  Oftentimes people may start the program without being 100% mentally ready, and they’re setting themselves up for failure—you have to be ready to trade a few bad things for a few more good things in return. 
Upon starting (or re-starting), make an actual list of pros and cons to weight loss.  Sure, there may be a few things to give up in the short term like dessert after each meal or a glass of wine every evening, but compare that list to all that you’ll gain in the long term: no more joint pain, no more shortness of breath, more energy, clothes that fit, better mood….. Everyone’s list will be different, but the value of the items on the Pros list will far outweigh that of the Cons list.  This month, keep your eyes on the prize by writing your own Vision Statement for weight loss , and focus on all the good things you have to look forward to as you keep succeeding at losing weight.
To keep yourself focused on your ultimate goal, try writing a Vision Statement for your weight loss.  This statement will provide both inspiration and direction for your efforts.  While there is no one way to create a vision statement for yourself, check out some pointers from SparkPeople on coming up with your own.
The inspiration part of it will answer questions like why you want to lose weight, and why the hard work to do it will be worth it.  Your answers may be somewhat general , but you should strive to include some specificity as well.  
The "direction" part of your statement should tell you what needs to change in your life to get you where you want to be.  This part is more tangible—focus on what you can and will do to make improvements, and avoid getting caught up in what is not going right at the moment. 
Your statement should be in writing, and try to include photos or other objects (like magazine headlines or photos) that will remind you of your goals and vision when the going gets tough.  Remember, this statement is going to be useful for keeping your goals in sight—make the statement work for you!